Analysis of #OzHA2013

A few weeks ago I attended the 2013 annual conference of the Australian Historical Association in Wollongong.  There were many tweets from the conference and a few blogposts were written.  Yet many sessions were not reported online.

In order to give a view of the whole conference, not just the sessions I attended, I have analysed the conference program and shared the results on my history blog, Stumbling Through the Past.  I also analysed the conference tweets in order to understand more about the live reporting of the conference using this medium.

This post explains the methodology underpinning my analysis.  I do this because I believe that it is important that researchers allow themselves to be accountable for their work by allowing others to check what they have done.  I also believe that it is important that researchers share their data where possible so that other researchers can use it to do their own analysis.

There is also a third reason for this post.  I hope it will help other people learn some simple but powerful techniques that they can use in their research.  This blog is aimed at people starting out in digital humanities so the explanations will be basic. Continue reading

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Digital Humanities – the First Steps

After I finished my thesis at the end of last year, I used my free time to start exploring the world of digital humanities.  I started out my professional life as an accountant and as part of our university degree back in the 1980s we were required to do programming in COBOL, dabble with databases (structured, not relational!) and we were exposed to spreadsheets in the days before excel.  In year 12 at school I did computer studies which included a fair amount of programming in Basic.  Throughout my career in accounting and later working in public relations, I have had to work with spreadsheets, databases etc, but I have not done any programming since the 1980s.

Then I went back to university and studied history.  I was astonished. Continue reading